Incredibly Unique Churches

The Sedlec Ossuary or bone church is a small Roman Catholic chapel, located beneath the Cemetery Church of All Saints in the Czech Republic. The ossuary is estimated to contain the skeletons of between 40,000 and 70,000 people, whose bones have in many cases been artistically arranged to form decorations and furnishings for the chapel. The ossuary is among the most visited tourist attractions of the Czech Republic, attracting over 200,000 visitors yearly. An enormous chandelier of bones, which contains at least one of every bone in the human body, hangs from the center of the nave with garlands of skulls draping the vault.

Bone Church, Czech Republic

LEGO Church (Netherlands

See-through Church (Belgium)
The church is 10 meters high and is made of 100 layers and 2000 columns of steel. Depending on the perspective of the viewer, the church is either perceived as a massive building or seems to dissolve – partly or entirely – in the landscape. On the other hand, looking at the landscape from within the church, the surrounding countryside is redefined by abstract lines. The design of the church is based on the architecture of the multitude of churches in the region, but through the use of horizontal plates, the concept of the traditional church is transformed into a transparent object of art.

Jubilee Church (Rome, Italy
The Jubilee Church, formally known as Chiesa di Dio Padre Misericordioso, is a Roman Catholic church and community center in Tor Tre Teste in Rome. According to Richard Meier, its architect, it is “the crown jewel of the Vicariato di Roma’s (Archdiocese of Rome) Millennium project”. The Church serves eight thousand residents of the Tor Tre Teste area and was meant to socially “revive” Tor Tre Teste.

St. Basil’s Cathedral (Moscow, Russia)
The Cathedral of the Protection of Most Holy Theotokos on the Moat or Pokrovsky Cathedral are official names for a Russian Orthodox church in Red Square in Moscow. The church is also called the Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed, anglicized as Saint Basil’s Cathedral. It was built from 1555–61 on orders from Ivan the Terrible and commemorates the capture of Kazan and Astrakhan. St. Basil’s marks the geometric center of Moscow. It has been the hub of the city’s growth since the 14th century and was the city’s tallest building until the completion of the Ivan the Great Bell Tower in 1600.

Sagrada Familia (Barcelona, Spain)
The Basílica Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família, is a large Roman Catholic church in Barcelona, Spain, designed by Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí (1852–1926). Although incomplete, the church is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Paraportiani Church, Greece
The Church of Panagia Paraportiani is situated in the neighbourhood of Kastro, in the town of Chora, on the Greek island of Mykonos. Its name literally means “Our Lady of the Side Gate” in Greek, as its entrance was found in the side gate of the entrance to the Kastro area. The building of this church started in 1425 and was not completed until the 17th century. This impressive, whitewashed church actually consists of five other churches attached all together: the four churches are all on the ground and constitute the base of the fifth church that has been built on top of them.

Borgund Stave Church, Norway
Borgund Stave Church is a stave church located in Borgund, Lærdal, Norway. It is classified as a triple nave stave church of the so-called Sogn-type. This is also the best preserved of Norway’s 28 extant stave churches. Borgund was built sometime between 1180 and 1250 AD with later additions and restorations. Its walls are formed by vertical wooden boards, or staves, hence the name “stave church”. The four corner posts were connected to one another by ground sills, resting on a stone foundation.

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